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Oceans Governance and Fisheries

Oceans Governance and Fisheries

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The Eastern Caribbean Regional Ocean Policy (ECROP), developed by the OECS Commission, updates the 2013 framework for the sustainable development, management, and conservation of the Eastern Caribbean marine environment. Recognising the ocean's economic potential, the policy promotes a Blue Economy to enhance livelihoods, jobs, and ocean health through sustainable resource use. It commits OECS Member States to coordinated, sustainable ocean management and supports regional collaboration and harmonization of actions. The ECROP includes a vision, principles, policy outcomes, and goals, complemented by National Ocean Policies. The eight policy outcomes focus on securing marine resource access, monitoring human activity, maintaining ecosystem integrity, promoting sustainable development, adopting integrated coastal management, increasing ocean stewardship, strengthening climate resilience, and ensuring informed decision-making.

As concluded by its mid-term review and as confirmed by this evaluation, the Caribbean Regional Oceanscape Project (CROP) represents a major step in the important, innovative, long-term process aimed at developing a sustainable blue economy in the OECS region. It is a process that began a decade ago, when the OECS Commission and its Member States committed themselves to set up adequate ocean governance as a requirement for the development of a blue economy in the region, within the framework of the Eastern Caribbean Regional Ocean Policy (ECROP). The CROP was implemented thanks to funds from the GEF channelled through the World Bank. Over its four years of implementation, the project has produced an impressive amount of quality outputs and triggered a number of important processes that provide the foundation for a transition towards effective ocean governance and a vibrant blue economy in the region.

This material was prepared under the Caribbean Regional Oceanscape Project (CROP) funded by the Global Environment Facility through the World Bank. The contents herein have been presented to the Government of Dominica for consideration and the findings, interpretations, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in this material does not necessarily reflect the views of the OECS Commission or the Government. The OECS Commission does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. This material should not be reproduced or distributed without the prior consent of the OECS Commission or the Government of Dominica.

This material was prepared under the Caribbean Regional Oceanscape Project (CROP) funded by the Global Environment Facility through the World Bank. The contents herein have been presented to the Government of Grenada for consideration and the findings, interpretations, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in this material does not necessarily reflect the views of the OECS Commission or the Government. The OECS Commission does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. This material should not be reproduced or distributed without the prior consent of the OECS Commission or the Government of Grenada.

This material was prepared under the Caribbean Regional Oceanscape Project (CROP) funded by the Global Environment Facility through the World Bank. The contents herein have been presented to the Government of St Kitts and Nevis for consideration and the findings, interpretations, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in this material does not necessarily reflect the views of the OECS Commission or the Government. The OECS Commission does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. This material should not be reproduced or distributed without the prior consent of the OECS Commission or the Government of St Kitts and Nevis.

This material was prepared under the Caribbean Regional Oceanscape Project (CROP) funded by the Global Environment Facility through the World Bank. The contents herein have been presented to the Government of St Vincent and the Grenadines for consideration and the findings, interpretations, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in this material does not necessarily reflect the views of the OECS Commission or the Government. The OECS Commission does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. This material should not be reproduced or distributed without the prior consent of the OECS Commission or the Government of St Vincent and the Grenadines.

This material was prepared under the Caribbean Regional Oceanscape Project (CROP) funded by the Global Environment Facility through the World Bank. The contents herein have been presented to the Government of Saint Lucia for consideration and the findings, interpretations, recommendations, and conclusions expressed in this material does not necessarily reflect the views of the OECS Commission or the Government. The OECS Commission does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. This material should not be reproduced or distributed without the prior consent of the OECS Commission or the Government of Saint Lucia.

DOMINICA NATIONAL OCEAN POLICY
 336 Downloads
 07-12-21

Dominica has jurisdiction over an extensive marine area along with the associated living and non-living resources. It is an acknowledged fact that the oceans contribute to the overall well-being of Dominicans that they offer tremendous potential for creating employment, generating incomes and contributing to overall social and economic development. The marine area of Dominica is also home to important biodiversity that provides the natural capital to underpin the Blue Economy and which must be conserved and where necessary improved.

While a number of existing sectors undoubtedly contribute to the social and economic wellbeing of Dominica, the benefits to be derived from the oceans are not fully explored, and neither is there an indication of the precise economic worth of the contribution of the oceans.


Sectoral and species-based approaches are not sufficient to effectively deliver sustainable development and protection of our fragile marine environment. An approach is needed that coordinates management across sectors and resources and integrates environmental management directly with economic development, fiscal policy and social goals. Such an approach requires a change in how we view, manage, govern and use the ocean.

This National Ocean Policy (NOP) establishes a framework for integrated marine planning and management of Dominica’s marine space and the activities that occur within it from 2020 until 2035. All relevant planning, authorisation or enforcement decisions, or development of government policy, will take account of this NOP and the supporting Strategic Action Plan (SAP).

GRENADA NATIONAL OCEAN POLICY
 359 Downloads
 07-12-21

Grenada has jurisdiction over an extensive marine area along with the associated living and non-living
resources. It is an acknowledged fact that the oceans contribute to the overall well-being of Grenadians that they offer tremendous potential for creating employment, generating incomes and contributing to overall social and economic development. The marine area of Grenada is also home to important biodiversity that provides the natural capital to underpin the Blue Economy and which must be conserved and where necessary improved.


While a number of existing sectors undoubtedly contribute to the social and economic wellbeing of Grenada, the benefits to be derived from the oceans are not fully explored, and neither is there an indication of the precise economic worth of the contribution of the oceans.


Sectoral and species-based approaches are not sufficient to effectively deliver sustainable development and protection of our fragile marine environment. An approach is needed that coordinates management across sectors and resources and integrates environmental management directly with economic development, fiscal policy and social goals. Such an approach requires a change in how we view, manage, govern and use the ocean.


This National Ocean Policy (NOP) establishes a framework for integrated marine planning and management of Grenada’s marine space and the activities that occur within it from 2020 until 2035. All relevant planning, authorisation or enforcement decisions, or development of government policy, will take account of this NOP and the supporting Strategic Action Plan (SAP).

SAINT LUCIA NATIONAL OCEAN POLICY
 524 Downloads
 07-12-21

Saint Lucia has jurisdiction over an extensive marine area along with the associated living and non living resources. It is an acknowledged fact that the oceans contribute to the overall well-being of Saint Lucians that they offer tremendous potential for creating employment, generating incomes and contributing to overall social and economic development. The marine area of Saint Lucia is also home to important biodiversity that provides the natural capital to underpin the Blue Economy and which must be conserved and where necessary improved.


While a number of existing sectors undoubtedly contribute to the social and economic wellbeing of Saint Lucia, the benefits to be derived from the oceans are not fully explored, and neither is there an indication of the precise economic worth of the contribution of the oceans.


Sectoral and species-based approaches are not sufficient to effectively deliver sustainable development and protection of our fragile marine environment. An approach is needed that coordinates management across sectors and resources and integrates environmental management directly with economic development, fiscal policy and social goals. Such an approach requires a change in how we view, manage, govern and use the ocean.


This National Ocean Policy (NOP) establishes a framework for integrated marine planning and management of Saint Lucia’s marine space and the activities that occur within it from 2020 until 2035. All relevant planning, authorisation or enforcement decisions, or development of government policy, will take account of this NOP and the supporting Strategic Action Plan (SAP).

Saint Kitts and Nevis has jurisdiction over an extensive marine area along with the associated living and non-living resources. It is an acknowledged fact that the oceans contribute to the overall well- being of citizens and that they offer tremendous potential for creating employment, generating incomes and contributing to overall social and economic development. The marine area of Saint Kitts and Nevis is also home to important biodiversity that provides the natural capital to underpin the Blue Economy and which must be conserved and where necessary improved.


While a number of existing sectors undoubtedly contribute to the social and economic wellbeing of Saint Kitts and Nevis, the benefits to be derived from the oceans are not fully explored, and neither is there an indication of the precise economic worth of the contribution of the oceans.

Sectoral and species-based approaches are not sufficient to effectively deliver sustainable development and protection of our fragile marine environment. An approach is needed that coordinates management across sectors and resources and integrates environmental management directly with economic development, fiscal policy and social goals. Such an approach requires a change in how we view, manage, govern and use the ocean.


This National Ocean Policy (NOP) establishes a framework for integrated marine planning and
management of Saint Kitts and Nevis’ marine space and the activities that occur within it from 2020
until 2035. All relevant planning, authorisation or enforcement decisions, or development of
government policy, will take account of this NOP and the supporting Strategic Action Plan (SAP).

This document sets out recommendations for proposed changes to the current Cabinet endorsed National Ocean Policy (NOP) of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) (2018). These recommendations have arisen from a review of NOP undertaken as part Output 3 of sub-component (Developing Ocean Policies and Strategies) of the Caribbean Regional Oceanscape Project (CROP).

A fully revised NOP was drafted for SVG and is included in Annex 1. This document is draft for national consultation only, and the recommendations within this report refer to certain sections of it for ease although it has not been suggested that the NOGC adopt it in its entirety at this stage.

This report represents Output 2 of Component 1.2 of the Caribbean Regional Oceanscape Project (CROP) consultancy. It is a baseline assessment and gap analysis of national policies, and policy delivery capacity for national priorities, for Dominica, Grenada, St Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St Vincent and the Grenadines. It also assesses compliance and consistency with the Eastern Caribbean Regional Ocean Policy (ECROP).


As set out in the CROP 1.2 terms of reference, the report presents as an overarching regional analysis with annexes which comprehensively review each individual country’s situation which can then be used to set the framework for the delivery of bespoke National Ocean Policies (NOP) and Coastal and Marine Spatial Plans (CMSP).

The proposed promotional strategy and marketing plan includes a portfolio of investment and Blue Economy development projects that both utilize and strengthen institutional, infrastructural and policy interventions within the region’s marine and coastal areas. These include the implementation of coastal master plans (CMP), marine spatial plans (MSP) and their associated policy and institutional components such as national ocean policies (NOP) and national ocean governance committees (NOGC). Additionally, the portfolio of Blue Economy-related initiatives is expected to advance the OECS’ blue growth priority areas including the interconnected sectors of fisheries, shipping, tourism, and transportation; traditional livelihoods and local activities inclusive of artisanal fisheries, aquaculture inclusive of seamoss farming , wellness and recreational use; new opportunities in the emerging sectors of renewable energy and bioprospecting; and enhanced management of ecological vulnerability.

Mapping Ocean Wealth in Dominica
 184 Downloads
 07-12-21

In Dominica, many people rely on reef fisheries for food and income, and there has been an increasing recognition in the region to better manage these resources, especially in the face of climate change. The value of coastal and marine resources are often over-looked, but can be considerable as highlighted below.

The maps and statistics highlighted here are only a brief synthesis but point to the utility of both enumerating and mapping tourism value. Such maps and numbers may be critical in building a Blue Economy in the region, providing guidance on the location of key national assets, enabling such assets to be fully incorporated into planning, empowering communities and other users.

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